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Sarah Winnemucca (1844-1891) In the first known copyrighted book by a Native American woman, Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims, Winnemucca documented her Paiute people’s initial encounters with white explorers. The settlers, she wrote, “came like a lion, yes, like a roaring lion, and have continued so ever since.” One of the first Paiutes to learn English, she spent her life as an interlocutor, lecturer, activist for Native rights, school organizer and author, working to protect…

Sarah Winnemucca In the first known copyrighted book by a Native American woman, Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims, Winnemucca documented her Paiute people’s initial encounters with white explorers.

Sarah Winnemucca (1844–1891) was one of the most influential and charismatic Native American women in American history. Born near the Humboldt River Sink in Nevada to a legendary family of Paiute leaders at a time when the Paiutes’ homeland and way of life were increasingly threatened by the influx of Anglo settlers, Sarah later wrote that the white men “came like a lion, yes, like a roaring lion, and have continued so ever since.”

Sarah Winnemucca was one of the most influential and charismatic Native American women in American history. Born near the Humboldt River Sink in Nevada to a legendary family of Paiute.

Lizzie, daugther of Sioux chief Long Wolf amazing clothes including the concho belt

Neva, Spotted Wolf - Arapaho - 1863:

CDV of Neva and Spotted Wolf, Arapaho Delegates to 1863 Visit Abraham Lincoln, Western & Historic Americana, Dec and

IRON , 1879

Record Photo of Portrait of Chief Iron in Partial Native Dress, with Fur-Wrapped Braids, Hairpipe Choker, Pipe, and Pipe Bag n.

O KUN DE KUN

O-kun-de-kun (To keep the net up), warrior of Leech Lake band of Chippewa, 1880

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